Wednesday, October 5, 2016

A Growth Mindset - Flexibility

     We continue to work on building a classroom culture that fosters a growth mindset here in Room 208.  As you may recall from an earlier post, mindset is an idea credited to Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck after many years of researching achievement and success.  By definition, if you have a growth mindset, you believe that your skills, habits, and abilities are growing and changing and can improve with effort.  In contrast, a fixed mindset is defined as having the belief that your abilities are already set, or fixed.
     A few weeks back, I introduced our first trait that supports a growth mindset, optimism.  The kids are living this trait daily both in their work and play.  It warms my heart to hear them chatting with one another about their own moments of optimism when attempting a new math strategy, or playing a new game on the playground.  Music to my ears!
     I recently introduced a second trait that supports a growth mindset, flexibility.  Using the book, The Most Magnificant Thing, by Ashley Spires, the children learned that flexibility is seeing and trying many possible actions within a task.  In this story, the main character decides that she is going to make the most magnificent thing. She knows exactly how it will look and work.  Unfortunately, making her magnificent thing isn't so easy, and the girl repeatedly tries and fails.  She eventually manages to get it just right.  After reading this book, I introduced a "second grade friendly" definition of flexibility: when one thing doesn't work, you try a different way.  The kids have absolutely embraced this new trait and actually used it today to describe me to our art teacher, Ms.Higgison.  They shared that Mrs. Moll is very optimistic when she tries to sketch pictures in the classroom and often needs to be flexible when her drawings don't turn out as planned (these kiddos know me well)!
     I continue to be awed by the ways the kids are showing both optimism and flexibility here in our classroom community. 











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